Sustainable, Recycled Corporate Garden

Design summary: 

This design concept for this corporate garden border was in line with Etihad Airways commitment to sustainable solutions. The idea was to turn one small but highly prominent border area into a sustainable, low water usage garden using Permaculture design principles and recycled items gathered from various parts of the business.

About the design: 

The idea was that this would act as a demonstration garden that could be used to further develop techniques for sustainable, efficient, productive gardens in other areas of the corporate environment for the future.
It created an experiential space for visitors and staff alike, with climate appropriate herbs, medicinal plants and small shrubs growing in a small contained area. Each plant species section was labelled, and a information board explaining the concept was be placed next to the garden.
We used simple, proven techniques such as composting, mulching, plant stacking, companion planting and other organic gardening practises, to produce a thriving and abundant self perpetuating space. It added interest and became a talking point. It was not only visually appealing, but educational with low energy input.
What filled this space?
Previously the border was laid to grass with 2 cycad trees either end. A huge amount of water was used throughout the year in order to keep the grass green.

My design was to create an attractive as well as a sensory garden that people can pick, smell and feel. I did not use any ornamental flowers that was the corporate norm. We sourced from specialist grower all climate appropriate plants taking into account the exposed location. Using a lot of indigenous plants of the region we found a great way of representing the culture of Etihad.
Many of these plants by nature are also wildlife friendly for insects and birds. The planting was quiet dense to start with and many of the plants self seeded. After the first growing season we were able to thin these out and reuse the excess to create the second such garden.

Date of design: 
2015
Designers: 
Karen Noon